December 9, 2016

Fall Highlights, Construction Zones, & Road Maps

We are in a period of great flux. There is movement everywhere so I’m going to take a few minutes this morning to slow down and take a look at where we are going and at what we are doing to help us get there. Care to join me?

I’m going to jump forward a bit and invite you to view this slideshow. It has recent highlights about how we are getting to where we want to go – from great teachers to great conversations.

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October 27, 2016

Some thoughts on change and the reform

reformtalk

This was originally going to be a post talking about change and the reform (or the renewal, or whatever you want to call it) yet I don’t want to just add another drop to the bucket of words that is already overflowing about the reform like reform vs renewal, group work vs individual work, learning situations vs learning activities, text books, reinvestment tasks, student-centered, program centered, manifestations of learning, lecture vs experiential learning, learner vs student, grammar vs. whole language … because, in reality, there is no this vs that.

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September 8, 2016

Offer of Service 2016-17 – How can I help you?

We are at the beginning of an exciting year with all of the anticipation that new beginnings bring us!

Jack's 1st bus ride

I need your help in discovering teacher stories to document and make videos about as well as to collaborate on the creation of new PD Mosaic tiles to use throughout the province!

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Posted in: News
June 29, 2016

Summer Infoletter: Thanking you all

I love my job.

Everyday is different as I work with the Adult Education community across the province in our joint quest to get better at what we do. I learn so much every single day from all of you.

As we enter the summer season, I want to thank all of the teachers, students, support staff, consultants, and administrators who welcome me into their school boards, centres, and classrooms – who share their work and ideas with me everyday.

Without all of you and your tenacious collaboration, my job would be near to impossible.

A specific highlight for me this year was how I am seeing the use of technology become more integrated in practices across the province. Technology use is becoming less of an event and is starting to be used much more naturally, when it is needed and when it makes sense. This is something I think about a lot and it is exhilarating to see it come to life! Here is a video I created last summer that talks about this very thing.

And finally, here are the fruits of your collaboration! These are some of the most recent resources I have put together with and because of you. I am looking forward to continuing our work in August!

Teacher Stories YouTube Channel
This is where all of the teacher story videos live. Some of them are also included in different PD Mosaic tiles but if you just want to be inspired by teachers in Adult Education from across the province, take a look here. http://bit.ly/TeacherStoryVideos

PD Mosaic
Here are three PD Mosaic resources that I put together in the past month or so. They were created in collaboration with a lot of different people, so be sure to scroll down to the bottom of each tile to see who contributed. While you are there, take some time to look through the rest of the site. You never know, you may see something that inspires you or even someone you know!

  • An Intro to Evaluation FOR Learning – including ideas for why and how to get started from teachers http://bit.ly/EvalForLearning
  • Learning in Stations – including one teacher’s story about how she got started using stations with her adult learners and her plans for the future http://bit.ly/PDMosaicStations
  • Triangulation – creating a clearer picture of student learning through formative assessment http://bit.ly/TriangPDM

(And a special thanks to Susie for inspiring this post 🙂 )
Tracy

Posted in: News
May 26, 2016

Learning at a Distance (or up close!): thoughts inspired by #REFAD2016

I am in Ottawa at the annual conference on distance education offered by REFAD. One of the opening comments was that distance education is just one of the tools we have to reach our learners and to help frame their learning. I like that the conference started off in this vein. It flows well with my own beliefs in tools – that they are just tools in service of our real work: student learning.

The task then is how best to design learning situations that take place at a distance (or up close!) to reach the needs of our learners in ways that make sense.

The answer seems to lie in relationship and intention.

These are the same themes Avi and I explored with online tutors in adult education a few weeks ago.

CORAL (Complementary Online Resources for Adult Learners) is an online tutoring service offered to adult learners from LEARN Quebec. CORAL’s Barbara and Cheryl asked us to accompany their tutors in some professional development on tutoring at a distance.

At REFAD, presenters from CEGEP á Distance (CAD) told us their story of online tutoring. They talked about the centrality of feedback for success and for fighting dropout rates and absenteeism in distance learning.

What I found especially interesting is that their tutors are all CEGEP teachers, which is a similar situation as our CORAL tutors who are all teachers within Quebec’s English sector Adult Ed system. What the CAD is doing, is providing their tutors with explicit professional development in how to provide effective, intentional feedback as the backbone of their practice.

Roselyne Boyer from Université de Laval spoke about the biggest task in online learning being to manage the human element within all of the technology and in face of the distance. That is, in fact, her vision, as shown in this image from her presentation.

IMG_0059

It is really from this point that Avi and I framed our Professional Development with the tutors at CORAL. Our main message was that no matter where we are teaching, the student-teacher relationship frames the work.

Rather than focusing on the technology behind online learning, if we focus on student learning we can then find the tools that make the most sense for everyone within that context.

To return to what I wrote earlier – while the teacher student relationship frames the work, there is also that other human factor that is often missing from the context of the work: the social context.

P., a high school student from Ontario took both online and face to face courses at his school and he shared his experiences with us at REFAD2016. While he did well in his online courses, he preferred his face to face courses because of his friends in the room. I have a feeling that a perfect online course (if that can possibly exist…) will exist somewhere in between the online and the face to face.

So. Flexibility, differentiation, and a recognition of the human element (it is sacred) need to be key factors of learning at a distance. Not very different from learning in presence, is it?

**Featured image: Don’t waste your time or money on ROT! Wellcome Library, London, on Flickr. Shared via CC. BY. ND. NC